×

GREAT NEWS FOR THE PATIENTS OF DR. STEVEN BERNSTORF!

Dr. Bernstorf, Chablis, and Nikki are moving their eye clinic to 1317 N. Elm Street, Suite 4, Parkview Plaza, across from Moses Cone Hospital on January 11, 2020. The Randleman Road office will be closed, except for the glasses side of the building.

This is great news for all of you and for us! We have merged with Groat Eyecare Associates, P.A., which is a well-established eye clinic staffed with four highly skilled eye doctors. We will join Robert Groat, MD; his two sons, Chris Groat, MD and Scott Groat, MD; and Sandy Cohen, MD. I have gotten to know them very well over many years. Robert Groat performed my wife’s cataract surgery with perfect results. Chris Groat has performed all of my patient’s glaucoma operations for the past 4 years. More recently, I have referred many patients to Scott Groat for various problems also. Sandy Cohen is a cornea specialist to whom I refer patients for corneal ulcers, injuries and operations.

I AM NOT RETIRING! This move allows me, Chablis, and Nikki to concentrate on patient care. We will no longer be filing insurance claims and managing a business. I have split my energy between patient care and running the business since 1988, and I am ready to give that up to focus on what I love – patient care.

What will my patients get out of this merger?

- Emergency care from top surgeons

- Three excellent young eye doctors to rely on if I need to cut back as I get older.

- Second opinion and surgery consults across the hall instead of across town.

- Best of all! We will be able to continue with doctor/patient relationships we have established.

- We are very excited about this merger. Please follow us to Groat Eyecare Associates, P.A., and I hope to continue to work with those of you we have known for years.

I am looking forward to seeing each of you in our new location!

UV Radiation and Your Eyes

Image of a sunset.

Optometry warnings about the damaging effects of ultraviolet radiation on our eyes have not yet reached the degree of public awareness of that of skin damage. Yet, the sun can be just as damaging upon our eyes with unprotected exposure. Short-term exposure to very bright sunlight can result in a type of sunburn to our eyes regardless of the season. Photokeratiitis -- also known as "snow blindness" and "flash burns" -- is a sunburn to the eye's cornea and conjunctiva, the membranes lining the eyelids and the outermost lining of the eye. Like a skin sunburn, the initial inflammation, pain and redness can last up to 48 hours before subsiding. Treatment such as cold cloths over the eyes and an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medication can help relieve some of the painful symptoms, but the best treatment is prevention best obtained by wearing sunglasses and a hat with a brim.

The Damage Adds Up

One day on the beach and a couple of days of sore eyes doesn't seem like much, but eye care providers warn that the effect is cumulative and the damage increases with every day of unprotected overexposure. Long-term damage goes beyond crow's feet from squinting in the bright sunlight. Years of unprotected exposure to the sun can result in increased chances of cataracts, damage to the retina, macular degeneration, cancer of the eye itself and cancer of the eyelid. Pterygium, a recurring condition where the conjunctiva grows over the cornea to restrict vision, requires repeated surgeries to keep in check is also common.

Not All Sunglasses Are Equal

Any pair of sunglasses is better than wearing none at all, but not all sunglasses provide the same degree of protection to the eye. Ask your eye care provider for recommendations to fit your lifestyle and your budget.

Monday:

8:30 AM

4:30 PM

Tuesday:

8:30 AM

4:30 PM

Wednesday:

8:30 AM

4:30 PM

Thursday:

8:30 AM

4:30 PM

Friday:

8:30 AM

4:30 PM

Saturday:

By Appt.

By Appt.

Sunday:

Closed

Closed