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GREAT NEWS FOR THE PATIENTS OF DR. STEVEN BERNSTORF!

Dr. Bernstorf, Chablis, and Nikki are moving their eye clinic to 1317 N. Elm Street, Suite 4, Parkview Plaza, across from Moses Cone Hospital on January 11, 2020. The Randleman Road office will be closed, except for the glasses side of the building.

This is great news for all of you and for us! We have merged with Groat Eyecare Associates, P.A., which is a well-established eye clinic staffed with four highly skilled eye doctors. We will join Robert Groat, MD; his two sons, Chris Groat, MD and Scott Groat, MD; and Sandy Cohen, MD. I have gotten to know them very well over many years. Robert Groat performed my wife’s cataract surgery with perfect results. Chris Groat has performed all of my patient’s glaucoma operations for the past 4 years. More recently, I have referred many patients to Scott Groat for various problems also. Sandy Cohen is a cornea specialist to whom I refer patients for corneal ulcers, injuries and operations.

I AM NOT RETIRING! This move allows me, Chablis, and Nikki to concentrate on patient care. We will no longer be filing insurance claims and managing a business. I have split my energy between patient care and running the business since 1988, and I am ready to give that up to focus on what I love – patient care.

What will my patients get out of this merger?

- Emergency care from top surgeons

- Three excellent young eye doctors to rely on if I need to cut back as I get older.

- Second opinion and surgery consults across the hall instead of across town.

- Best of all! We will be able to continue with doctor/patient relationships we have established.

- We are very excited about this merger. Please follow us to Groat Eyecare Associates, P.A., and I hope to continue to work with those of you we have known for years.

I am looking forward to seeing each of you in our new location!

Frequently Asked Questions

Image of glasses on a table.

Why do I need to see an eye care provider?

Many “silent” diseases, such as glaucoma and diabetes, can only be detected through regular eye exams. When these conditions are discovered earlier rather than later, they become easier to treat or manage, allowing for better long-term preservation of eyesight.

In addition, reading glasses from the drugstore often do not work well because most people have astigmatism and/or different prescriptions in each eye. As a result, many of these individuals experience persistent eye fatigue and headaches. Forgoing the eye exam also sacrifices the opportunity to screen for treatable diseases, as mentioned above.

How often do I need to get new eye glasses?

This depends on a number of personal factors, such as changing needs, tastes or lifestyle, but you should visit your eye doctor at least once each year. If you notice problems with vision or headaches, then it’s best to consult your doctor right away for a full evaluation and new glasses, if needed.

How can I tell if I need bifocals?

Bifocals and progressive lenses are most often prescribed for presbyopia in those over age 40 and for individuals who have trouble seeing clearly both at a distance and when reading. Bifocals can also help a person who over-crosses his or her eyes when viewing close objects. An eye exam with a qualified eye doctor can assist you with determining whether bifocals are right for you.

Instead of bifocals, can I use progressive lenses and choose a smaller eye glass frame?

Yes. Progressive lenses offer more precision in your viewing range within a smaller lens diameter. However, some frames are too small for a proper fit; a trained optician can work with you to find a frame that is sized correctly for both your lens and your face shape.

Why are the lenses so thick?

The final lens thickness depends on the strength of your prescription, the size of your frame, and your personal measurements. Fortunately, recent innovations in lens designs and materials have made lenses thinner by up to 60% in some cases. If lens thickness is a concern for you, notify the optometry staff member; he or she will help you select a frame and lens that allow you to use a thinner lens.

Will I have to wear eye glasses forever?

Unfortunately, you probably will unless you elect to use contact lenses or corrective laser eye surgery. The great news is that there are lens and surgical advancements in optometry everyday.

Monday:

8:30 AM

4:30 PM

Tuesday:

8:30 AM

4:30 PM

Wednesday:

8:30 AM

4:30 PM

Thursday:

8:30 AM

4:30 PM

Friday:

8:30 AM

4:30 PM

Saturday:

By Appt.

By Appt.

Sunday:

Closed

Closed