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GREAT NEWS FOR THE PATIENTS OF DR. STEVEN BERNSTORF!

Dr. Bernstorf, Chablis, and Nikki are moving their eye clinic to 1317 N. Elm Street, Suite 4, Parkview Plaza, across from Moses Cone Hospital on January 11, 2020. The Randleman Road office will be closed, except for the glasses side of the building.

This is great news for all of you and for us! We have merged with Groat Eyecare Associates, P.A., which is a well-established eye clinic staffed with four highly skilled eye doctors. We will join Robert Groat, MD; his two sons, Chris Groat, MD and Scott Groat, MD; and Sandy Cohen, MD. I have gotten to know them very well over many years. Robert Groat performed my wife’s cataract surgery with perfect results. Chris Groat has performed all of my patient’s glaucoma operations for the past 4 years. More recently, I have referred many patients to Scott Groat for various problems also. Sandy Cohen is a cornea specialist to whom I refer patients for corneal ulcers, injuries and operations.

I AM NOT RETIRING! This move allows me, Chablis, and Nikki to concentrate on patient care. We will no longer be filing insurance claims and managing a business. I have split my energy between patient care and running the business since 1988, and I am ready to give that up to focus on what I love – patient care.

What will my patients get out of this merger?

- Emergency care from top surgeons

- Three excellent young eye doctors to rely on if I need to cut back as I get older.

- Second opinion and surgery consults across the hall instead of across town.

- Best of all! We will be able to continue with doctor/patient relationships we have established.

- We are very excited about this merger. Please follow us to Groat Eyecare Associates, P.A., and I hope to continue to work with those of you we have known for years.

I am looking forward to seeing each of you in our new location!

Fuchs' Corneal Dystrophy

Image of two doctors examining a patient's eye with a flashlight.

Fuchs' dystrophy (pronounced fooks DIS-truh-fee) is an eye disease characterized by degenerative changes to the cornea’s innermost layer of cells. The cause for Fuchs' dystrophy is not fully understood. If your mother or father has the disease, then there is roughly a 50 percent chance that you will develop it as well. While Fuchs' dystrophy can sometimes be genetic, it can also occur in individuals who have no known family history of the disease.

Understanding Fuchs’ Dystrophy

Fuchs’ dystrophy typically causes vision problems in individuals who are 50 years or older, although symptoms are sometimes diagnosed in individuals who are younger. While Fuchs’ dystrophy can affect both genders, it most commonly affects women. This eye disease affects the innermost layer of cells in the cornea, the endothelium, causing degenerative changes. As the disease progresses, the cornea swells (known as a cornea edema) and clouds, which causes a decline in vision. Finally, the swelling also causes blisters to develop on the front of the cornea, a condition known as bullous keratopathy.

Symptoms and Diagnosis

Fuchs’ dystrophy symptoms include eye pain, foggy vision, blurred vision, sensitivity to light, the appearance of halos around a light source, and vision trouble at night. Individuals typically experience poor vision upon awakening that improves later in the day. Another common symptom is the sensation that a foreign object (e.g., an eyelash) is in the eye, even though nothing is there.

A comprehensive eye exam is necessary to diagnose Fuchs' dystrophy. During this exam, an eye care professional uses an instrument called a “slit lamp” to examine the cornea. The slit lamp magnifies the cornea, allowing the eye care professional to detect the subtle changes to the cornea’s endothelium cells, which characterize the disease. The earliest clinical signs are a reduced number of endothelium cells and small, drop-like lesions along the endothelium.

Treatment

Treatment for Fuchs’ dystrophy depends on the stage of the disease at diagnosis. For an early-stage diagnosis, it is possible to improve vision with special 5% sodium chloride drops that remove excess water from the cornea. If the disease is caught in later stages, a cornea transplant may be necessary to replace a ruptured cornea. As an alternative to a full cornea transplant, a new treatment known as DLEK (deep lamellar endothelial keratoplasty) can replace the endothelium while leaving the upper layers of the cornea untouched. Finally, if you have been diagnosed with Fuchs’ dystrophy, keep in mind that certain eye surgeries, including LASIK, can actually worsen this condition.

Monday:

8:30 AM

4:30 PM

Tuesday:

8:30 AM

4:30 PM

Wednesday:

8:30 AM

4:30 PM

Thursday:

8:30 AM

4:30 PM

Friday:

8:30 AM

4:30 PM

Saturday:

By Appt.

By Appt.

Sunday:

Closed

Closed